Doing a Masters as a Deputy Head

Over twelve months ago, I found a Master’s programme that I liked the look of. For years, I had looked at programmes in Educational Leadership and Management, Educational Policy into Practice, even Education: Comparative and International Perspectives, but none really appealed to me enough to pursue them any further. Whilst deleting the many junk emails…

Over twelve months ago, I found a Master’s programme that I liked the look of.

For years, I had looked at programmes in Educational Leadership and Management, Educational Policy into Practice, even Education: Comparative and International Perspectives, but none really appealed to me enough to pursue them any further.

Whilst deleting the many junk emails from my school inbox one afternoon, I came across an advert for the Masters’ in Expert Teaching available through Ambition Institute. I was immediately intrigued:

Master’s programme – check; Developing expertise as a teacher – check. This was looking good. 

Neatly sold as providing you with the opportunities to “take your teaching expertise to the next level. Get the very best out of your pupils by improving how you teach” I began to look at what other benefits the programme offered. The following is taken directly from the Ambition Institute MA Expert Teaching webpage:

 

Benefits for you

Turn experience into expertise
For teachers looking for a fresh challenge to invigorate their teaching practice. You’ll develop advanced teaching techniques to help you make more deliberate decisions in the classroom.

Make your pupils’ learning stick
You’ll draw on cognitive science to find new ways to engage and motivate pupils and accelerate and consolidate their learning.

One-to-one coaching
Very few master’s courses provide you with a one-to-one coach. They will help you develop your understanding and use your learning to make evidence-informed changes in your classroom practice.

Designed around you
We’ve designed this course to fit in with your busy life by using flexible online learning tools and regular coaching sessions.

 

Needless to say, I signed up, did the interview and attended the first conference in August 2021. Almost a year in, I won’t pretend it has not been hard work balancing the demands of the programme and the ever changing demands of working in a school, because it has – but I’m almost half way through the programme, am learning so much about my own practice and how to develop it further and finding a new love for engaging with educational research.

In order to share my learning, I am going to create a blog series called #DevelopingExpertTeaching. Here I will capture my learning from the different stages of each module. For example:

  1. The Explore phase is the equivalent to a Literature Review on the topic at hand.
  2. The Translate phase explore implications and approaches to adapting classroom practice.
  3.  The Implement phase is where the piloting takes place and adaptations are made to the change in practice.
  4. The Investigate phase assesses the strengths and limitations of the change in practice.
  5. The Disseminate phase pulls everything together ready to share with others as a full assignment.

The posts are very much linked to my setting and my class; I’m sure everyone will take something from each of them, but they certainly won’t provide a “ready made teaching improvement or action plan” – that’s not the purpose of them.

Watch this space for the first post on Consolidating Student Learning.

#MasterInExpertTeaching  #KeepGettingBetter